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Posted By Robert. Stephenson

File:Stephenson Torino Porta Nuova.jpg

 
Monumental plaque dedicated by the Italians to George and Robert Stephenson in the fiftieth anniversary (1880) the opening of the railway line Liverpool-Manchester (1830). The plate is walled in the eastern portico of the railway station of Torino Porta Nuova (Nizza street side).
   
 
Posted By Robert. Stephenson
 
George Stephenson examining William Hedley?s Puffing Billy

 

George Stephenson examining William Hedley?s Puffing Billy 

Photo: Getty Images

 

 

 
Posted By Robert. Stephenson

In 1823 Edward Pease joined with Michael Longdridge, thomas Richardson, George Stephenson and his son Robert, to form a company and Robert Stephenson & Company, at Forth Street, Newcastle-Upon-Tyne, became the world's first locomotive builder. Stephenson recruited Timothy Hackworth, one of the engineers who had helped William Hedley to produce Puffing Billy, to work for the company.

The first railway locomotive was finished in September 1825. Initially called Active, it was later given the name Locomotion. The boiler of the Locomotion had a single fire tube and two vertical cylinders let into the barrel and the four wheels were coupled by rods rather than a chain. The Stockton & Darlington Railroad was opened on 27th September, 1825. Large crowds saw George Stephenson at the controls of the Locomotion as it pulled 36 wagons filled with sacks of coal and flour. The intial journey of just under 9 miles took two hours. However, during the final descent into the Stockton terminus, speeds of 15mph (24kph) were reached. This increased speed surprised one man and he fell from one of the wagons and was badly injured. Although the Locomotion was not a long term success, it laid the foundations for all future generations of steam locomotives.

 
Posted By Robert. Stephenson

 

 
Posted By Robert. Stephenson

Southwick

 

Southwick was built by Robert Stephenson & Hawthorn in 1942 and was to a design of locomotive almost completely restricted to shipyard use.

The locomotive was employed at the Pallion Shipyard, Sunderland of William Doxford and Sons Ltd. until 1970.

In 1990 the locomotive was acquired by George Bowler and Nick Morgan members of the Bahamas Locomotive Society.

"Southwick" can now be seen as part of the BLS Collection at Ingrow on the Keighley & Worth Valley Railway, West Yorkshire. UK.

 


 
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